Bathroom Vanities And Cabinets

Bathroom Sink Cabinets

Every bathroom sink needs a cabinet beneath it, whether to support the sink or merely provide storage for toilet amenities. These cabinets range widely in construction and intent, with some putting form over function while others are intended to be as practical and inexpensive as possible. Regardless of design and appearance, it is important that a bathroom sink be designed to hold up to the moist environment inherent in being beneath a sink. Bathroom sink cabinets need to be resistant to mold and mildew as well as providing ample room for the sink itself and all the pipes necessary.

Because a sink and a sink cabinet need to be built for one another, most sinks and cabinets now come in standard sizes. It’s thus important to make sure, when replacing or installing a sink cabinet, to measure the size of the sink they will go with. Most sinks now come in one of a number of assorted sizes to ensure compatibility between sinks and cabinets. This ensures a tight fit, which not only looks good, it prevents water from leeching down into the wood or plastic of the cabinet and damaging.

Bathroom Sink Cabinets

One of the most important attributes of any sink cabinet is the ability to withstand water damage. Even the best constructed and properly installed sink will occasionally leak, and the bathroom is an inherently wet environment. It is therefore important that both the inside and outside of the sink cabinet be waterproof. Plastic and stone cabinets are inherently waterproof, but metal and wood cabinets must be provided with a special coating. This is particularly true of particleboard cabinets, as the many nooks and crannies created by the unfinished interior are ideal for collecting water and providing a substrate for mold. It may also be a good idea to put down mats or paper in order to absorb the water in particleboard sinks.

When installing a sink cabinet, it is important to follow the instructions exactly. While many sinks are capable of supporting themselves through attachments to the wall, others are designed to rely on a sink cabinet for support. If the cabinet does not provide enough support, the sink can break free, flooding the bathroom as the pipes are dislodged. The fall an also break the sink. Most sink cabinets are designed to fit tight with the sink above them and are thus any gaps or wobbles are a sign of a bad installation. Advances in cabinet design have made it easier and easier to install them, and many are able to fit tightly without the use of caulk, although caulking certain cabinets is a great way to prevent leaks.


Bathroom Vanities And Cabinets